Walking in the rain … again

Another day, another rainy morning. So what to do when the weather leaves a lot to be desired?
How about another long breakfast this time already with a glass of sparkling wine. It was a holiday after all and it set the mood for the day.IMG_9017IMG_9018IMG_9023

And then another bus tour, this time on the yellow line though. When we arrived at our station we found out that the bus would take another 45 min to get there since we were station No. 19 on this line. One of the bus hustlers told us to walk a couple of blocks to get to station No. 4 where buses would go every 5-10 minutes. Was so not true, because we ended up waiting at least 20 minutes again. Never mind, we were in no rush at all, just a bit on the cold side.

Finally on the bus we started another tour with annoying music and little information. At least this time everyone had a window seat.IMG_9064

Another round of sights, again from the bus. Please enjoy.IMG_8928IMG_8935IMG_8937IMG_8942IMG_8946IMG_8947IMG_8952Remember this bridge? We were back at the Chain Bridge below the Buda Castle.
IMG_8968Another train station called the west station or something because the trains are coming in from the east.

Near St. Stephen’s Basilica we got off, having decided on the spur of the moment to visit the basilica. Ok, not true at all. We wanted to lángos at the Christmas market but when we passed the church on the way there we decided to go in. It was beautiful inside, impressive and breathtaking. It also shows in a side room the right hand of the saint. The hand or better the “Holy Right” is in remarkable condition, especially when you consider that he died almost 1000 years ago.IMG_8971IMG_8972IMG_8974IMG_8976IMG_8978IMG_8979IMG_8980

When outside we headed directly to the lángos place to try this real traditional dish. It was a greasy as the Austrian version, maybe a bit better and definitely with less garlic. Still, not something to talk about.IMG_8985IMG_8992IMG_8991IMG_8990

From here on we only had one more stop at the supermarket to buy some provisions for the train ride (prosecco and such things), another one at a stall for chimney cake were we bought two right from the griddle (if you can call it that) and then found out the the locals are buying it cooled off. And with good reason because when you buy it hot, it tastes under baked. Another waste of good calories. Culinary wise Hungary was not really abundant, just rich in calories.

Back at the hotel and after a short discussion on how to get to the train station, we decided on the metro again. Quick and cheap, or “slumming” as my friend Tici likes to call it.IMG_9002IMG_9003IMG_9004IMG_9007

And with two bottles of sparkling wine, sweets, chips from the journey there, water and cold chimney cake we were well supplied for our way home. Traveling in style I call that.
Yours, Pollybert

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2 thoughts on “Walking in the rain … again

  1. Did nobody tell you that the Western railway station had been designed by Gustave Eiffel years before his Tower? :-)

    http://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budapest_Nyugati_p%C3%A1lyaudvar

    The làngos you had there was not original – remember the one I had on my soup in Menza? That’s the real (and tasty) one. This is more a pizza style variation and I recall the there was a reference to the ‘Svàb’ heritage of the cook, meaning he is ethnic german (‘Donauschwaben’) – so no original hungarian làngos there ;-)

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    • The voice in the bus talked about Eiffel, so if course we know about it. And after the lángos on the way to the hotel we saw a small stall where they made the teal deal. But by then we were full.

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